I’m going to do all this reading and research anyway… might as well share what I learn!
NEWS
+
VIEWS
July 15 2024

Hurricane Beryl disrupts Houston, old dams challenged by a new climate, who has priority for water in the Colorado?, heat records fall in the U.S., Supreme Court overturns precedent that deferred to government’s technical expertise

The New York Times reports that Hurricane Beryl became a Category 5 storm earlier in the season than any previous hurricane, a direct result of the hot ocean temperatures. The Atlantic calls Beryl a terrifying omen, and quotes a consulting meteorologist from Florida, who said the storm “is not normal, in any way, shape, or form.” A large hurricane early in the year is consistent with the predictions that the 2024 hurricane season will include many powerful storms, and the Times describes how strong hurricanes represent a threat to the electrical grid.

Right on cue, Beryl struck Texas as a powerful tropical storm on July 8, knocking-out power to over two million people. The Washington Post examines the flooding in Houston which, despite investing billions in flood protection, was still inundated by a storm that was not massive by today’s standards (Inside Climate News calls Beryl a warning shot for Houston, given the likelihood of stronger storms in the future). The Guardian reports that five days after the storm, 800,000 Houston residents remain without power as a heat advisory is in effect, with heat index values over 100°F. This is becoming all too familiar to Houston residents, as about one million people in the area were without power for several days in May after an intense rain storm.

The New York Times describes the search for portable generators, and how the roar of these devices indicates the more well-to-do parts of the city during power outages. A line stretched out the door at Home Depot in north Houston as people sought generators and chain saws (for cutting downed trees). One store had generators, but did not have power to process credit-card purchases. The gas to power generators is also in high demand and can be hard to find. The local utility is trying to set up larger generators for critical facilities like cooling centers, health-care facilities, police and fire stations, senior centers and educational centers…

read more
June 30 2024

extreme heat strikes around the world, extreme rainfall is also widespread, Antarctic glaciers under threat from intrusion of warmer water, mangroves and coral reefs provide vital flood protection, the American Climate Corps

Record heat waves exposed billions of people around the world to dangerous conditions in June. The Washington Post reported that, in New Delhi, the temperature reached 126°F, causing deaths there and in other cities in the region. The associated aridity has restricted the water supply to Bangalore and New Delhi. Over 1,300 Muslims participating in the holy pilgrimage to Mecca died due to the heat. 1,400 heat records fell across five continents, including in the United States, where tens of millions residents of the Midwest and the East were exposed to extreme heat.

There is no doubt that our emissions of greenhouse gases have made heat waves worse. The Post noted that “for some 80 percent of the world’s population — 6.5 billion people — the heat of the past week was twice as likely to occur because humans started burning fossil fuels and releasing greenhouse gases into the atmosphere.” The New York Times reports that, “between May 2023 and May 2024, an estimated 6.3 billion people, or roughly 4 out of 5 people in the world, lived through at least a month of what in their areas were considered abnormally high temperatures.” While there was some expectation that temperatures this year would moderate as La Niña conditions in the Pacific Ocean replace El Niño, 2024 appears on pace to eclipse 2023 as the hottest year ever. Readers of The Washington Post describe how their experience of summer has changed. The Guardian notes that Texas and Florida have rejected regulations that would protect outdoor workers from extreme heat, something several other states have already adopted.

Albawaba.com reports that Kuwait is struggling to meet electricity demand during the heat, and the Kuwait’s Ministry of Electricity, Water and Renewable Energy announced rolling black-outs on June 20th. The chief sustainability officer for American University in Beirut noted that the entire Middle East is challenged by rising temperatures, adding that “the length of heat waves is growing.” A massive power outage struck the Balkans, causing widespread disruption in Montenegro, Bosnia, Croatia and Albania…

read more

IN BRIEF: PAST
CLIMATE NEWS

MORE MY TAKES
 

NEWS
+
VIEWS
I’m going to do all this reading and research anyway… might as well share what I learn!
July 15 2024

Hurricane Beryl disrupts Houston, old dams challenged by a new climate, who has priority for water in the Colorado?, heat records fall in the U.S., Supreme Court overturns precedent that deferred to government’s technical expertise

The New York Times reports that Hurricane Beryl became a Category 5 storm earlier in the season than any previous hurricane, a direct result of the hot ocean temperatures. The Atlantic calls Beryl a terrifying omen, and quotes a consulting meteorologist from Florida, who said the storm “is not normal, in any way, shape, or form.” A large hurricane early in the year is consistent with the predictions that the 2024 hurricane season will include many powerful storms, and the Times describes how strong hurricanes represent a threat to the electrical grid.

Right on cue, Beryl struck Texas as a powerful tropical storm on July 8, knocking-out power to over two million people. The Washington Post examines the flooding in Houston which, despite investing billions in flood protection, was still inundated by a storm that was not massive by today’s standards (Inside Climate News calls Beryl a warning shot for Houston, given the likelihood of stronger storms in the future). The Guardian reports that five days after the storm, 800,000 Houston residents remain without power as a heat advisory is in effect, with heat index values over 100°F. This is becoming all too familiar to Houston residents, as about one million people in the area were without power for several days in May after an intense rain storm.

The New York Times describes the search for portable generators, and how the roar of these devices indicates the more well-to-do parts of the city during power outages. A line stretched out the door at Home Depot in north Houston as people sought generators and chain saws (for cutting downed trees). One store had generators, but did not have power to process credit-card purchases. The gas to power generators is also in high demand and can be hard to find. The local utility is trying to set up larger generators for critical facilities like cooling centers, health-care facilities, police and fire stations, senior centers and educational centers…

read more
June 30 2024

extreme heat strikes around the world, extreme rainfall is also widespread, Antarctic glaciers under threat from intrusion of warmer water, mangroves and coral reefs provide vital flood protection, the American Climate Corps

Record heat waves exposed billions of people around the world to dangerous conditions in June. The Washington Post reported that, in New Delhi, the temperature reached 126°F, causing deaths there and in other cities in the region. The associated aridity has restricted the water supply to Bangalore and New Delhi. Over 1,300 Muslims participating in the holy pilgrimage to Mecca died due to the heat. 1,400 heat records fell across five continents, including in the United States, where tens of millions residents of the Midwest and the East were exposed to extreme heat.

There is no doubt that our emissions of greenhouse gases have made heat waves worse. The Post noted that “for some 80 percent of the world’s population — 6.5 billion people — the heat of the past week was twice as likely to occur because humans started burning fossil fuels and releasing greenhouse gases into the atmosphere.” The New York Times reports that, “between May 2023 and May 2024, an estimated 6.3 billion people, or roughly 4 out of 5 people in the world, lived through at least a month of what in their areas were considered abnormally high temperatures.” While there was some expectation that temperatures this year would moderate as La Niña conditions in the Pacific Ocean replace El Niño, 2024 appears on pace to eclipse 2023 as the hottest year ever. Readers of The Washington Post describe how their experience of summer has changed. The Guardian notes that Texas and Florida have rejected regulations that would protect outdoor workers from extreme heat, something several other states have already adopted.

Albawaba.com reports that Kuwait is struggling to meet electricity demand during the heat, and the Kuwait’s Ministry of Electricity, Water and Renewable Energy announced rolling black-outs on June 20th. The chief sustainability officer for American University in Beirut noted that the entire Middle East is challenged by rising temperatures, adding that “the length of heat waves is growing.” A massive power outage struck the Balkans, causing widespread disruption in Montenegro, Bosnia, Croatia and Albania…

read more

IN BRIEF: PAST
CLIMATE NEWS

MORE MY TAKES