I’m going to do all this reading and research anyway… might as well share what I learn!
NEWS
+
VIEWS
August 15 2020

bigger storms in California’s future, Trump cooks the books (again!), shifting baseline syndrome, low-carbon aluminum, leading economists call for ending the carbon economy

The San Francisco Chronicle reports on a recent study concluding that, in the future, “the biggest of Pacific storms will dump 40% more rain and snow on parts of the Sierra, boost the hourly rate of precipitation in hills and valleys nearly a third, on average, and be about 4 degrees Fahrenheit warmer upon landfall.” Driving these changes is the physical reality that, as air warms, it can hold more moisture. The future projection of more intense Pacific storms is making people remember the Great Flood of 1862, when you could sail from Fresno to Sacramento, the new Governor had to travel to his inauguration in a rowboat, the state capitol was moved temporarily to San Francisco and California almost went bankrupt.

The Public Policy Institute of California has an interesting article about the growing flood risk in California from the more intense atmospheric river events expected as the climate changes. The article summarizes the recent analysis of the First Street Foundation, which demonstrated how the flood-risk projections of FEMA are out of date. FEMA estimates that 500,000 properties in California face a 1% chance of flooding in a given year, while First Street found that number to be 1.1 million properties and growing. Meanwhile, the Union of Concerned Scientists concludes that more than 800 hazardous Superfund sites near the Atlantic and Gulf coasts are at risk of flooding in the next 20 years, even with low rates of sea level rise. It is interesting to note that the lead author of this study started this work at the U.S. EPA under President Obama, but the Trump Administration sidelined the analysis. The San Francisco Chronicle reports on a recent study from Stanford that describes how sea level rise not only will flood some coastal roadways, but will also generate traffic far from the flooding as motorists seek alternate routes…

read more
July 31 2020

Biden links climate action with economic stimulus, methane emissions climb, tipping points drawing near, the challenge of managed retreat, record high-tide flooding

An article in New York Magazine describes how Joe Biden’s climate plan is being framed as a key part of the economic stimulus the country requires to recover from the pandemic. This is an important and welcome development, as transitioning from fossil fuels requires a major investment, and if we invest in the “business as usual” fossil-fuel-powered economy, our climate goals will be out of reach (the Biden campaign video introduces this plan for a clean-energy revolution and environmental justice). An article in the New York Times describes how climate change and other environmental issues are emerging as a clear difference between the presidential candidates, and Governor Jay Inslee discusses Biden’s climate plan in an interview in New York Magazine.

An article in the New York Times documents that global emissions of methane, a potent greenhouse gas, reached a record high in 2017, driven mainly by leaks from fossil-fuel facilities and emissions from agriculture. The article notes that a given amount of methane produces 86 times more warming than carbon dioxide over a twenty year period. Rob Jackson, a Stanford earth scientist who leads the Global Carbon Project, notes that “if we continue to release methane as we have done in recent decades, we have no chance” to keep global temperature increases to just 2°C. Newsweek reports how scientists are using satellites to measure methane emissions from remote lakes in the Arctic…

read more

IN BRIEF: PAST
CLIMATE NEWS

MORE MY TAKES
 

NEWS
+
VIEWS
I’m going to do all this reading and research anyway… might as well share what I learn!
August 15 2020

bigger storms in California’s future, Trump cooks the books (again!), shifting baseline syndrome, low-carbon aluminum, leading economists call for ending the carbon economy

The San Francisco Chronicle reports on a recent study concluding that, in the future, “the biggest of Pacific storms will dump 40% more rain and snow on parts of the Sierra, boost the hourly rate of precipitation in hills and valleys nearly a third, on average, and be about 4 degrees Fahrenheit warmer upon landfall.” Driving these changes is the physical reality that, as air warms, it can hold more moisture. The future projection of more intense Pacific storms is making people remember the Great Flood of 1862, when you could sail from Fresno to Sacramento, the new Governor had to travel to his inauguration in a rowboat, the state capitol was moved temporarily to San Francisco and California almost went bankrupt.

The Public Policy Institute of California has an interesting article about the growing flood risk in California from the more intense atmospheric river events expected as the climate changes. The article summarizes the recent analysis of the First Street Foundation, which demonstrated how the flood-risk projections of FEMA are out of date. FEMA estimates that 500,000 properties in California face a 1% chance of flooding in a given year, while First Street found that number to be 1.1 million properties and growing. Meanwhile, the Union of Concerned Scientists concludes that more than 800 hazardous Superfund sites near the Atlantic and Gulf coasts are at risk of flooding in the next 20 years, even with low rates of sea level rise. It is interesting to note that the lead author of this study started this work at the U.S. EPA under President Obama, but the Trump Administration sidelined the analysis. The San Francisco Chronicle reports on a recent study from Stanford that describes how sea level rise not only will flood some coastal roadways, but will also generate traffic far from the flooding as motorists seek alternate routes…

read more
July 31 2020

Biden links climate action with economic stimulus, methane emissions climb, tipping points drawing near, the challenge of managed retreat, record high-tide flooding

An article in New York Magazine describes how Joe Biden’s climate plan is being framed as a key part of the economic stimulus the country requires to recover from the pandemic. This is an important and welcome development, as transitioning from fossil fuels requires a major investment, and if we invest in the “business as usual” fossil-fuel-powered economy, our climate goals will be out of reach (the Biden campaign video introduces this plan for a clean-energy revolution and environmental justice). An article in the New York Times describes how climate change and other environmental issues are emerging as a clear difference between the presidential candidates, and Governor Jay Inslee discusses Biden’s climate plan in an interview in New York Magazine.

An article in the New York Times documents that global emissions of methane, a potent greenhouse gas, reached a record high in 2017, driven mainly by leaks from fossil-fuel facilities and emissions from agriculture. The article notes that a given amount of methane produces 86 times more warming than carbon dioxide over a twenty year period. Rob Jackson, a Stanford earth scientist who leads the Global Carbon Project, notes that “if we continue to release methane as we have done in recent decades, we have no chance” to keep global temperature increases to just 2°C. Newsweek reports how scientists are using satellites to measure methane emissions from remote lakes in the Arctic…

read more

IN BRIEF: PAST
CLIMATE NEWS

MORE MY TAKES