I’m going to do all this reading and research anyway… might as well share what I learn!
NEWS
+
VIEWS
December 15 2019

the challenge of cement, bleak news on carbon emissions, climate change worries the Federal Reserve, farms hit hard in midwest, floating solar power

While many people recognize the challenge that aviation presents to our goals for decarbonization (something the airline industry is aware of and working on), less appreciated are major industries such as steel, cement and glass production. These industrial processes require very high heat, and use large quantities of fossil fuels to achieve this goal. In the case of cement, the process also produces carbon dioxide directly when limestone breaks down into calcium oxide (also known as lime). Cement manufacture has been estimated to be 8% of humanity’s carbon footprint, three times larger than that from aviation. Grist reports on a variety of process changes and new technologies designed reduce the cement industry’s footprint. One company has developed a high temperature solar-thermal process to substitute for part of the fossil fuel inputs for producing cement. While the technical know-how to slash the cement industry”s carbon emissions is becoming available, an industry representative notes that the harder task is how “to organize our policy and our markets so that doing it will be rewarded.”

The word “bleak” and “brutal” has appeared in headlines describing the recent report from the United Nations that concluded greenhouse-gas emissions rose 1.8% in 2018, continuing humanity’s rush towards a future that has an average temperature over 3°C hotter than preindustrial times. The Guardian reports that global emissions must now fall every year by over 7% to keep warming within the 1.5°C target that will avoid the worst climate-change impacts. The only times when emissions dropped by a comparable amount in any country were during the Great Recession and the collapse of the Soviet Union…

read more
November 30 2019

fire impacts on communities that don’t burn, scientists underestimate climate impacts, bad grades on our energy report card, growth of offshore wind power

The Los Angeles Times has an important article that describes the ongoing impact of the Camp Fire, over a year later, on Chico, a town that was not in the burn area. Residents of the burn area fled to Chico, which overnight saw its population increase by over 20%. This has strained police resources, the wastewater treatment plant and virtually every other public service required by the new residents (most of whom are not paying property taxes or sewer fees).

An op-ed in Time discusses why we should trust science, focusing in detail on how claims are evaluated in the scientific community. An article in the Guardian examines why it is frequently the case that scientists have underestimated the impacts and risks of climate change. An op-ed in the New York Times describes the evidence that climate change is occurring much faster than previously estimated by scientists…

read more

IN BRIEF: PAST
CLIMATE NEWS

MORE MY TAKES
 

NEWS
+
VIEWS
I’m going to do all this reading and research anyway… might as well share what I learn!
December 15 2019

the challenge of cement, bleak news on carbon emissions, climate change worries the Federal Reserve, farms hit hard in midwest, floating solar power

While many people recognize the challenge that aviation presents to our goals for decarbonization (something the airline industry is aware of and working on), less appreciated are major industries such as steel, cement and glass production. These industrial processes require very high heat, and use large quantities of fossil fuels to achieve this goal. In the case of cement, the process also produces carbon dioxide directly when limestone breaks down into calcium oxide (also known as lime). Cement manufacture has been estimated to be 8% of humanity’s carbon footprint, three times larger than that from aviation. Grist reports on a variety of process changes and new technologies designed reduce the cement industry’s footprint. One company has developed a high temperature solar-thermal process to substitute for part of the fossil fuel inputs for producing cement. While the technical know-how to slash the cement industry”s carbon emissions is becoming available, an industry representative notes that the harder task is how “to organize our policy and our markets so that doing it will be rewarded.”

The word “bleak” and “brutal” has appeared in headlines describing the recent report from the United Nations that concluded greenhouse-gas emissions rose 1.8% in 2018, continuing humanity’s rush towards a future that has an average temperature over 3°C hotter than preindustrial times. The Guardian reports that global emissions must now fall every year by over 7% to keep warming within the 1.5°C target that will avoid the worst climate-change impacts. The only times when emissions dropped by a comparable amount in any country were during the Great Recession and the collapse of the Soviet Union…

read more
November 30 2019

fire impacts on communities that don’t burn, scientists underestimate climate impacts, bad grades on our energy report card, growth of offshore wind power

The Los Angeles Times has an important article that describes the ongoing impact of the Camp Fire, over a year later, on Chico, a town that was not in the burn area. Residents of the burn area fled to Chico, which overnight saw its population increase by over 20%. This has strained police resources, the wastewater treatment plant and virtually every other public service required by the new residents (most of whom are not paying property taxes or sewer fees).

An op-ed in Time discusses why we should trust science, focusing in detail on how claims are evaluated in the scientific community. An article in the Guardian examines why it is frequently the case that scientists have underestimated the impacts and risks of climate change. An op-ed in the New York Times describes the evidence that climate change is occurring much faster than previously estimated by scientists…

read more

IN BRIEF: PAST
CLIMATE NEWS

MORE MY TAKES