I’m going to do all this reading and research anyway… might as well share what I learn!

NEWS
+
VIEWS

July 31 2018

tropical rainforests linked to U.S. agriculture,”next generation” nuclear power, solar power in South Carolina, California meets its 2020 greenhouse gas reduction target

Although investment in renewable energy is booming, Grist reports that investment in fossil fuels grew in 2017. Grist also has a review of “next generation” nuclear power, which describes a very active environment for research and development in this field. Decarbonizing our economy will be much more difficult if we cannot use nuclear power, but nuclear’s contribution is projected to decline as the current fleet of large, pressurized water reactors are uneconomical to build or to keep operating beyond their design lifetimes. While the Grist article focuses on entrepreneurs excited about new nuclear technologies, some very well-respected analysts are much less sanguine about the prospects of “next generation” nuclear. Dave Roberts at VOX reviews a recent study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences that concludes these technologies are unlikely to contribute to our electricity supply by mid-century.

An op-ed in the Washington Post describes water scarcity in Cape Town, South Africa, a city that has been facing the possibility of running out of water. Only one third of residents are achieving government conservation targets of 23 gallons of water per person per day, despite public shaming of egregious water use by the Mayor…

read more
July 15 2018

TV meteorologists, agroecology, a sand mafia, solar panel recycling

A remarkable and important development in the effort to educate Americans about climate change has been the evolution of meteorologists on television from mis-informers to active educators. TV meteorologists are the closest many Americans get to science, and the number of stories on global warming by TV meteorologists has increased 15-fold over five years (at this link you can also find some excellent interviews with TV meteorologists). Key to this shift has been the Climate Matters program of Climate Central, which develops relevant data analyses and graphics for use by meteorologists. InsideClimate News reports that Republican Senators are now questioning the National Science Foundation’s support for Climate Matters, claiming this is a political rather than an educational effort.

Marshall Shepherd, a past president of the American Meteorological Society, explains in Forbes why many meteorologists were previously skeptical about climate science due to their training, and how many TV stations shy away from discussing such a “controversial” topic…

read more

IN BRIEF: PAST
CLIMATE NEWS

MORE MY TAKES
 

NEWS
+
VIEWS

I’m going to do all this reading and research anyway… might as well share what I learn!

July 31 2018

tropical rainforests linked to U.S. agriculture,”next generation” nuclear power, solar power in South Carolina, California meets its 2020 greenhouse gas reduction target

Although investment in renewable energy is booming, Grist reports that investment in fossil fuels grew in 2017. Grist also has a review of “next generation” nuclear power, which describes a very active environment for research and development in this field. Decarbonizing our economy will be much more difficult if we cannot use nuclear power, but nuclear’s contribution is projected to decline as the current fleet of large, pressurized water reactors are uneconomical to build or to keep operating beyond their design lifetimes. While the Grist article focuses on entrepreneurs excited about new nuclear technologies, some very well-respected analysts are much less sanguine about the prospects of “next generation” nuclear. Dave Roberts at VOX reviews a recent study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences that concludes these technologies are unlikely to contribute to our electricity supply by mid-century.

An op-ed in the Washington Post describes water scarcity in Cape Town, South Africa, a city that has been facing the possibility of running out of water. Only one third of residents are achieving government conservation targets of 23 gallons of water per person per day, despite public shaming of egregious water use by the Mayor…

read more
July 15 2018

TV meteorologists, agroecology, a sand mafia, solar panel recycling

A remarkable and important development in the effort to educate Americans about climate change has been the evolution of meteorologists on television from mis-informers to active educators. TV meteorologists are the closest many Americans get to science, and the number of stories on global warming by TV meteorologists has increased 15-fold over five years (at this link you can also find some excellent interviews with TV meteorologists). Key to this shift has been the Climate Matters program of Climate Central, which develops relevant data analyses and graphics for use by meteorologists. InsideClimate News reports that Republican Senators are now questioning the National Science Foundation’s support for Climate Matters, claiming this is a political rather than an educational effort.

Marshall Shepherd, a past president of the American Meteorological Society, explains in Forbes why many meteorologists were previously skeptical about climate science due to their training, and how many TV stations shy away from discussing such a “controversial” topic…

read more

IN BRIEF: PAST
CLIMATE NEWS

MORE MY TAKES