I’m going to do all this reading and research anyway… might as well share what I learn!
NEWS
+
VIEWS
May 31 2019

a low carbon diet, earthworms impact climate, a political tipping point for climate, don’t be the laughingstock of the galaxy

What we eat is a big part of our climate footprint, especially in California with relatively low-carbon electricity. The New York Times has a superb analysis of the climate impact of various dietary choices (based in part on a recent study in Science) that concludes: (1) some foods (beef, lamb, cheese) have a bigger impact than others (pork, chicken and eggs), with plant-based foods typically having the lowest impact; (2) what you eat matters a lot more than whether it’s local or organic; (3) even small shifts, like eating less meat and more plants, or switching from beef to chicken, can reduce your climate footprint, and; (4) food waste is a significant part of our carbon footprint. Interestingly, the scientific study noted that the carbon footprint of producers of particular foods can vary by a factor of 50, suggesting there are important opportunities for individual producers to reduce the carbon footprint of their products (a key argument for a carbon tax).

A report by the Associated Press describes recent flooding in Houston, which is becoming a common occurrence. The Guardian reviews the link between climate change and hurricanes, noting that the intensity of hurricanes (not necessarily their frequency) is expected to increase as the world warms. InsideClimate News reports on a recent study that concludes it would be prudent to plan for 6.5 feet of sea level rise by 2100, over twice what was previously suggested by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. The difference is due to a developing understanding about ice sheet dynamics…

read more
May 15 2019

social cost of carbon, species extinction, sea level rise adaptation in the Bay Area, carbon farming, Bill Nye tells it like it is

What is the total cost of emitting a ton of carbon into the atmosphere, otherwise known as the “social cost of carbon?” MIT Technology Review examines recent research on this topic, noting that it is likely higher than has been estimated in the past. In addition, while the social cost of carbon is normally presented as a single number, the costs are not evenly distributed geographically around the world (or even across the U.S., with higher costs being born by those who live in the south and southwest of the country).

Tree rings are a vital source of information about past climate, and help place current temperatures and aridity in historical context. The New York Times has an in-depth look at tree ring science (dendrochronology) and the largest tree ring laboratory in the world at the University of Arizona. InsideClimate News reports on a recent study that uses tree rings and other methods to describe how global warming has been intensifying droughts starting in the 20th century…

read more

IN BRIEF: PAST
CLIMATE NEWS

MORE MY TAKES
 

NEWS
+
VIEWS
I’m going to do all this reading and research anyway… might as well share what I learn!
May 31 2019

a low carbon diet, earthworms impact climate, a political tipping point for climate, don’t be the laughingstock of the galaxy

What we eat is a big part of our climate footprint, especially in California with relatively low-carbon electricity. The New York Times has a superb analysis of the climate impact of various dietary choices (based in part on a recent study in Science) that concludes: (1) some foods (beef, lamb, cheese) have a bigger impact than others (pork, chicken and eggs), with plant-based foods typically having the lowest impact; (2) what you eat matters a lot more than whether it’s local or organic; (3) even small shifts, like eating less meat and more plants, or switching from beef to chicken, can reduce your climate footprint, and; (4) food waste is a significant part of our carbon footprint. Interestingly, the scientific study noted that the carbon footprint of producers of particular foods can vary by a factor of 50, suggesting there are important opportunities for individual producers to reduce the carbon footprint of their products (a key argument for a carbon tax).

A report by the Associated Press describes recent flooding in Houston, which is becoming a common occurrence. The Guardian reviews the link between climate change and hurricanes, noting that the intensity of hurricanes (not necessarily their frequency) is expected to increase as the world warms. InsideClimate News reports on a recent study that concludes it would be prudent to plan for 6.5 feet of sea level rise by 2100, over twice what was previously suggested by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. The difference is due to a developing understanding about ice sheet dynamics…

read more
May 15 2019

social cost of carbon, species extinction, sea level rise adaptation in the Bay Area, carbon farming, Bill Nye tells it like it is

What is the total cost of emitting a ton of carbon into the atmosphere, otherwise known as the “social cost of carbon?” MIT Technology Review examines recent research on this topic, noting that it is likely higher than has been estimated in the past. In addition, while the social cost of carbon is normally presented as a single number, the costs are not evenly distributed geographically around the world (or even across the U.S., with higher costs being born by those who live in the south and southwest of the country).

Tree rings are a vital source of information about past climate, and help place current temperatures and aridity in historical context. The New York Times has an in-depth look at tree ring science (dendrochronology) and the largest tree ring laboratory in the world at the University of Arizona. InsideClimate News reports on a recent study that uses tree rings and other methods to describe how global warming has been intensifying droughts starting in the 20th century…

read more

IN BRIEF: PAST
CLIMATE NEWS

MORE MY TAKES