I’m going to do all this reading and research anyway… might as well share what I learn!
NEWS
+
VIEWS
May 15 2020

2020 could be warmest year yet, the challenge of planning for sea level rise, reducing methane emissions, disinfecting the White House of quackery, solar and wind the cheapest sources of electricity

The Washington Post reports that last month tied for the warmest April on record for the globe. There is now a 75% chance that 2020 will be the warmest year since 1880 (and likely long before that). It is noteworthy that this is occurring despite there being no El Niño in the Pacific Ocean, as the latter phenomenon contributed to 2016 being the hottest year on record. James Hansen cautions that a La Niña may form later this year, and the cooling effect of this oceanic shift might keep 2020 from being a record year.

The Guardian reports on the dramatic melting of the Greenland ice sheet in the summer of 2019. This was driven by a high-pressure system above the region that caused melting over 96% of the ice sheet at some time in 2019, compared with an average of just over 64% between 1981 and 2010. Most importantly, the researchers conducting the study noted that IPCC scenarios do not include such high-pressure events, meaning that future melting could be twice as high as currently predicted. This result could have serious consequences for sea level rise…

read more
April 30 2020

Coronavirus and climate change, ocean heat waves, the future of Florida, Iowa a leader in wind energy and wind-energy jobs

A thoughtful article in Politico compares the challenges and possible responses to the coronavirus and climate change. The author notes that both are “problems whose dimensions are largely the province of scientific experts—employing complex data models aimed at illuminating future trends that the average citizen can understand in broad concept but not in detail. The essential question: Do you trust these experts, or not?” The remedies, however, touch on personal and community values, which engender much wider and chaotic discussion.

An article in Grist explores how certain human behavioral patterns contribute to our differing responses to these two threats. At Yale e360, an article reviews opinions on whether our experience with coronavirus make us more willing and able to address climate change, or less.

In Time, Naomi Oreskes argues that American conservatives’ aversion to “big government” left us woefully unprepared for the coronavirus, and we should not let the same thing happen for climate change. While it is too late for early action on climate change, “it is not too late to be organized and take action. It will require government, and some of that government will necessarily be big…”

read more

IN BRIEF: PAST
CLIMATE NEWS

MORE MY TAKES
 

NEWS
+
VIEWS
I’m going to do all this reading and research anyway… might as well share what I learn!
May 15 2020

2020 could be warmest year yet, the challenge of planning for sea level rise, reducing methane emissions, disinfecting the White House of quackery, solar and wind the cheapest sources of electricity

The Washington Post reports that last month tied for the warmest April on record for the globe. There is now a 75% chance that 2020 will be the warmest year since 1880 (and likely long before that). It is noteworthy that this is occurring despite there being no El Niño in the Pacific Ocean, as the latter phenomenon contributed to 2016 being the hottest year on record. James Hansen cautions that a La Niña may form later this year, and the cooling effect of this oceanic shift might keep 2020 from being a record year.

The Guardian reports on the dramatic melting of the Greenland ice sheet in the summer of 2019. This was driven by a high-pressure system above the region that caused melting over 96% of the ice sheet at some time in 2019, compared with an average of just over 64% between 1981 and 2010. Most importantly, the researchers conducting the study noted that IPCC scenarios do not include such high-pressure events, meaning that future melting could be twice as high as currently predicted. This result could have serious consequences for sea level rise…

read more
April 30 2020

Coronavirus and climate change, ocean heat waves, the future of Florida, Iowa a leader in wind energy and wind-energy jobs

A thoughtful article in Politico compares the challenges and possible responses to the coronavirus and climate change. The author notes that both are “problems whose dimensions are largely the province of scientific experts—employing complex data models aimed at illuminating future trends that the average citizen can understand in broad concept but not in detail. The essential question: Do you trust these experts, or not?” The remedies, however, touch on personal and community values, which engender much wider and chaotic discussion.

An article in Grist explores how certain human behavioral patterns contribute to our differing responses to these two threats. At Yale e360, an article reviews opinions on whether our experience with coronavirus make us more willing and able to address climate change, or less.

In Time, Naomi Oreskes argues that American conservatives’ aversion to “big government” left us woefully unprepared for the coronavirus, and we should not let the same thing happen for climate change. While it is too late for early action on climate change, “it is not too late to be organized and take action. It will require government, and some of that government will necessarily be big…”

read more

IN BRIEF: PAST
CLIMATE NEWS

MORE MY TAKES