I’m going to do all this reading and research anyway… might as well share what I learn!

NEWS
+
VIEWS

August 15 2018

a hot world on fire, feeding cows seaweed to fight climate change, attributing extreme weather to climate change, sea level rise threatens the Internet

The New York Times reports on the heat waves that have appeared all over the globe this year; the U.S., Japan, Africa, Europe and even the arctic. The article includes interviews with people who are experiencing these weather extremes. Grist summarizes a month of weather extremes in an article entitled The World is Hot, on Fire, and Flooding. The Guardian reports that wildfires are changing in frequency and physical intensity, including remarkable video of the “fire tornado” that struck Redding, CA, as part of the Carr Fire (the Los Angeles Times has more details on this remarkable geophysical phenomenon). The Guardian also summarizes impacts around the world, including fires in northern Sweden that have caused the Swedes to request fire-fighting assistance from other nations. President Trump responded to this disaster with an ignorant, false and thoughtless tweet about environmental laws that have resulted in a lack of water to fight fires (Peter Gleick explains in the Washington Post why the President’s tweet is nonsense).

David Leonhardt notes in the New York Times that in California “seven of the 12 most destructive wildfires on record have occurred in the last three years.” The Los Angeles Times reports on the Mendocino Complex Fire, which has supplanted the Thomas Fire of eight months ago as California’s largest wildfire. The San Jose Mercury News describes how the damage done by these fires has escalated as more and more people have moved into fire-prone regions…

read more
July 31 2018

tropical rainforests linked to U.S. agriculture,”next generation” nuclear power, solar power in South Carolina, California meets its 2020 greenhouse gas reduction target

Although investment in renewable energy is booming, Grist reports that investment in fossil fuels grew in 2017. Grist also has a review of “next generation” nuclear power, which describes a very active environment for research and development in this field. Decarbonizing our economy will be much more difficult if we cannot use nuclear power, but nuclear’s contribution is projected to decline as the current fleet of large, pressurized water reactors are uneconomical to build or to keep operating beyond their design lifetimes. While the Grist article focuses on entrepreneurs excited about new nuclear technologies, some very well-respected analysts are much less sanguine about the prospects of “next generation” nuclear. Dave Roberts at VOX reviews a recent study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences that concludes these technologies are unlikely to contribute to our electricity supply by mid-century.

An op-ed in the Washington Post describes water scarcity in Cape Town, South Africa, a city that has been facing the possibility of running out of water. Only one third of residents are achieving government conservation targets of 23 gallons of water per person per day, despite public shaming of egregious water use by the Mayor…

read more

IN BRIEF: PAST
CLIMATE NEWS

MORE MY TAKES
 

NEWS
+
VIEWS

I’m going to do all this reading and research anyway… might as well share what I learn!

August 15 2018

a hot world on fire, feeding cows seaweed to fight climate change, attributing extreme weather to climate change, sea level rise threatens the Internet

The New York Times reports on the heat waves that have appeared all over the globe this year; the U.S., Japan, Africa, Europe and even the arctic. The article includes interviews with people who are experiencing these weather extremes. Grist summarizes a month of weather extremes in an article entitled The World is Hot, on Fire, and Flooding. The Guardian reports that wildfires are changing in frequency and physical intensity, including remarkable video of the “fire tornado” that struck Redding, CA, as part of the Carr Fire (the Los Angeles Times has more details on this remarkable geophysical phenomenon). The Guardian also summarizes impacts around the world, including fires in northern Sweden that have caused the Swedes to request fire-fighting assistance from other nations. President Trump responded to this disaster with an ignorant, false and thoughtless tweet about environmental laws that have resulted in a lack of water to fight fires (Peter Gleick explains in the Washington Post why the President’s tweet is nonsense).

David Leonhardt notes in the New York Times that in California “seven of the 12 most destructive wildfires on record have occurred in the last three years.” The Los Angeles Times reports on the Mendocino Complex Fire, which has supplanted the Thomas Fire of eight months ago as California’s largest wildfire. The San Jose Mercury News describes how the damage done by these fires has escalated as more and more people have moved into fire-prone regions…

read more
July 31 2018

tropical rainforests linked to U.S. agriculture,”next generation” nuclear power, solar power in South Carolina, California meets its 2020 greenhouse gas reduction target

Although investment in renewable energy is booming, Grist reports that investment in fossil fuels grew in 2017. Grist also has a review of “next generation” nuclear power, which describes a very active environment for research and development in this field. Decarbonizing our economy will be much more difficult if we cannot use nuclear power, but nuclear’s contribution is projected to decline as the current fleet of large, pressurized water reactors are uneconomical to build or to keep operating beyond their design lifetimes. While the Grist article focuses on entrepreneurs excited about new nuclear technologies, some very well-respected analysts are much less sanguine about the prospects of “next generation” nuclear. Dave Roberts at VOX reviews a recent study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences that concludes these technologies are unlikely to contribute to our electricity supply by mid-century.

An op-ed in the Washington Post describes water scarcity in Cape Town, South Africa, a city that has been facing the possibility of running out of water. Only one third of residents are achieving government conservation targets of 23 gallons of water per person per day, despite public shaming of egregious water use by the Mayor…

read more

IN BRIEF: PAST
CLIMATE NEWS

MORE MY TAKES