I’m going to do all this reading and research anyway… might as well share what I learn!
NEWS
+
VIEWS
January 15 2020

73-year-old President bullies 16-year-old girl, catastrophic fires in Australia, EPA neglects established science, farmers see promise in regenerative agriculture, U.S. greenhouse gas emissions drop in 2019

Greta Thunberg, the 16-year-old from Sweden who started the Fridays for the Future movement, was named Time’s Person of the Year (the article is well worth reading). The President of the United States attacked Greta on Twitter. His cyberbullying demonstrates insecurity and immaturity that are at once pathetic and frightening (if you are wondering why this happens, check out the Mayo Clinic’s definition of narcissistic personality disorder). We already know how history will view Thunberg and Trump, and it will not go well for the President. Ilyse Hogue, President of NARAL, proposes this 2020 resolution, “Be Like Greta. Meet derision with humor. Weakness with strength. Insecurity with self-knowledge. Narcissism with vision. Cruelty with humanity.”

InsideClimate News reviews key findings from climate science over the past decade. Unfortunately, the upshot is that changes are occurring faster than previously predicted. This will challenge our ability to respond effectively, and makes our political inaction all the more alarming.

The Los Angeles Times reports on a new study that shows intensified ocean acidification on the west coast of North America. Using the sedimentary record of the shells left by the tiny sea creatures known as foraminifera, scientists documented how stronger upwelling periods that bring more carbon-rich waters to the surface combine with the carbon dioxide dissolving into the ocean to cause more acidification in our region…

read more
December 31 2019

atmospheric rivers, farmers responding to climate change, record heat in Australia, Goldman Sachs says no to coal-fired power

InsideClimate News reports on a recent study by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers on “atmospheric rivers,” the powerful rivers of water vapor in the atmosphere that produce much of the West’s rainfall but also its flooding (these events can carry twice as much moisture as the Amazon River). The study concludes that atmospheric rivers caused more than 99 percent of all flood damage in parts of coastal Oregon and California. The 10 most extreme atmospheric rivers caused nearly half of all the flood damage in the West between 1978 and 2017, costing about $23 billion. There is now evidence that these events will become more intense with climate warming, as the rivers will become larger and wetter. The study has suggestions for building resilience to these storm events.

Atmospheric rivers have been a component of the climate of western North America as far back as scientists have looked, and they can be enormous. Particularly notable is the winter of 1861-62, when it rained for weeks (66 inches of rain fell in Los Angeles). You could sail a boat from Fresno to Sacramento. The state capitol had to be relocated and California was forced into bankruptcy. I highly recommend the great article in Scientific American, The Coming MegaFloods.

Politico has an excellent article about the rapidly changing attitudes in the agricultural community to climate change. The last several years have included devastating droughts and major downpours that have heavily impacted farmers and ranchers, and they are responding by adopting more climate-friendly practices (such as the planting of cover crops). The article notes a strong feeling among farmers that they have been blamed in the past for environmental problems without much compassion or understanding of the challenges they face just to stay in business…

read more

IN BRIEF: PAST
CLIMATE NEWS

MORE MY TAKES
 

NEWS
+
VIEWS
I’m going to do all this reading and research anyway… might as well share what I learn!
January 15 2020

73-year-old President bullies 16-year-old girl, catastrophic fires in Australia, EPA neglects established science, farmers see promise in regenerative agriculture, U.S. greenhouse gas emissions drop in 2019

Greta Thunberg, the 16-year-old from Sweden who started the Fridays for the Future movement, was named Time’s Person of the Year (the article is well worth reading). The President of the United States attacked Greta on Twitter. His cyberbullying demonstrates insecurity and immaturity that are at once pathetic and frightening (if you are wondering why this happens, check out the Mayo Clinic’s definition of narcissistic personality disorder). We already know how history will view Thunberg and Trump, and it will not go well for the President. Ilyse Hogue, President of NARAL, proposes this 2020 resolution, “Be Like Greta. Meet derision with humor. Weakness with strength. Insecurity with self-knowledge. Narcissism with vision. Cruelty with humanity.”

InsideClimate News reviews key findings from climate science over the past decade. Unfortunately, the upshot is that changes are occurring faster than previously predicted. This will challenge our ability to respond effectively, and makes our political inaction all the more alarming.

The Los Angeles Times reports on a new study that shows intensified ocean acidification on the west coast of North America. Using the sedimentary record of the shells left by the tiny sea creatures known as foraminifera, scientists documented how stronger upwelling periods that bring more carbon-rich waters to the surface combine with the carbon dioxide dissolving into the ocean to cause more acidification in our region…

read more
December 31 2019

atmospheric rivers, farmers responding to climate change, record heat in Australia, Goldman Sachs says no to coal-fired power

InsideClimate News reports on a recent study by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers on “atmospheric rivers,” the powerful rivers of water vapor in the atmosphere that produce much of the West’s rainfall but also its flooding (these events can carry twice as much moisture as the Amazon River). The study concludes that atmospheric rivers caused more than 99 percent of all flood damage in parts of coastal Oregon and California. The 10 most extreme atmospheric rivers caused nearly half of all the flood damage in the West between 1978 and 2017, costing about $23 billion. There is now evidence that these events will become more intense with climate warming, as the rivers will become larger and wetter. The study has suggestions for building resilience to these storm events.

Atmospheric rivers have been a component of the climate of western North America as far back as scientists have looked, and they can be enormous. Particularly notable is the winter of 1861-62, when it rained for weeks (66 inches of rain fell in Los Angeles). You could sail a boat from Fresno to Sacramento. The state capitol had to be relocated and California was forced into bankruptcy. I highly recommend the great article in Scientific American, The Coming MegaFloods.

Politico has an excellent article about the rapidly changing attitudes in the agricultural community to climate change. The last several years have included devastating droughts and major downpours that have heavily impacted farmers and ranchers, and they are responding by adopting more climate-friendly practices (such as the planting of cover crops). The article notes a strong feeling among farmers that they have been blamed in the past for environmental problems without much compassion or understanding of the challenges they face just to stay in business…

read more

IN BRIEF: PAST
CLIMATE NEWS

MORE MY TAKES