I’m going to do all this reading and research anyway… might as well share what I learn!
NEWS
+
VIEWS
August 15 2019

automakers strike a deal with California, NASA should study the home planet, we're still building in the path of sea level rise, small change in fossil-fuel subsidies would be big

In a remarkable development, the State of California and several major automakers have reached a voluntary agreement to continue to pursue higher fuel-efficiency standards for automobiles to be sold in California (and, by extension, the other states that abide by California standards). Margo Oge, former EPA Transportation Chief who was deeply involved in negotiating the current federal standards under President Obama, has an excellent description of the agreement and its implications in Forbes (with more background information here and here). The automakers have grown increasingly uneasy with the Trump Administration's proposal to freeze auto-efficiency standards next year, which would would represent an incredible blow to efforts to reduce carbon emissions in the U.S. The administration's anti-regulation zealotry, combined with the desires of the oil industry, have resulted in the creation of a proposed standard that would damage our auto industry's ability to compete in what is now a global marketplace for automobiles. Thirty U.S. Senators have called upon General Motors and 13 other automakers to join this agreement.

The New York Times reports on the rise of deforestation in Brazil under the leadership of President Jair Bolsonaro, who is also slashing enforcement against violators. Approximately 20 percent of human-caused carbon emissions are the result of deforestation (and the subsequent burning and decomposition of trees), and higher rates of tropical deforestation will make it impossible to meet climate goals. An editorial in the Washington Post summarizes the problem...

read more
July 31 2019

managed retreat, water scarcity, you think it's hot now?, renewable natural gas, take action September 20 & 27!

The New York Times reports on how more cities are leveraging local, state and federal funds to buy out flood-prone properties rather than continue to repair or rebuild them after flood events. After a buyout, the house is razed and the land placed into a use (such as a park) that can accommodate flooding. This is making future floods "nonevents" rather than disasters.

One community that is struggling to use buyouts as a strategy to deal with sea level rise and coastal erosion is Pacifica, as noted in the Los Angeles Times. This detailed article examines sea walls, sand replenishment and managed retreat, and demonstrates the political challenges facing local government officials as they attempt to prepare their communities for the inevitable changes. The article also looks at planning and projects across California, including San Francisco, Ventura and part of Highway 1 near Piedras Blancas.

A new report from Moody's Analytics, summarized by the Washington Post, concludes that climate change will inflict severe economic costs in the future if not controlled. These costs, which will accrue mainly in the second half of this century, will be caused predominantly by impacts to human health, labor productivity, crop yields and tourism. An article in the New Yorker describes the growing movement for governments to declare climate emergencies...

read more

IN BRIEF: PAST
CLIMATE NEWS

MORE MY TAKES
 

NEWS
+
VIEWS
I’m going to do all this reading and research anyway… might as well share what I learn!
August 15 2019

automakers strike a deal with California, NASA should study the home planet, we're still building in the path of sea level rise, small change in fossil-fuel subsidies would be big

In a remarkable development, the State of California and several major automakers have reached a voluntary agreement to continue to pursue higher fuel-efficiency standards for automobiles to be sold in California (and, by extension, the other states that abide by California standards). Margo Oge, former EPA Transportation Chief who was deeply involved in negotiating the current federal standards under President Obama, has an excellent description of the agreement and its implications in Forbes (with more background information here and here). The automakers have grown increasingly uneasy with the Trump Administration's proposal to freeze auto-efficiency standards next year, which would would represent an incredible blow to efforts to reduce carbon emissions in the U.S. The administration's anti-regulation zealotry, combined with the desires of the oil industry, have resulted in the creation of a proposed standard that would damage our auto industry's ability to compete in what is now a global marketplace for automobiles. Thirty U.S. Senators have called upon General Motors and 13 other automakers to join this agreement.

The New York Times reports on the rise of deforestation in Brazil under the leadership of President Jair Bolsonaro, who is also slashing enforcement against violators. Approximately 20 percent of human-caused carbon emissions are the result of deforestation (and the subsequent burning and decomposition of trees), and higher rates of tropical deforestation will make it impossible to meet climate goals. An editorial in the Washington Post summarizes the problem...

read more
July 31 2019

managed retreat, water scarcity, you think it's hot now?, renewable natural gas, take action September 20 & 27!

The New York Times reports on how more cities are leveraging local, state and federal funds to buy out flood-prone properties rather than continue to repair or rebuild them after flood events. After a buyout, the house is razed and the land placed into a use (such as a park) that can accommodate flooding. This is making future floods "nonevents" rather than disasters.

One community that is struggling to use buyouts as a strategy to deal with sea level rise and coastal erosion is Pacifica, as noted in the Los Angeles Times. This detailed article examines sea walls, sand replenishment and managed retreat, and demonstrates the political challenges facing local government officials as they attempt to prepare their communities for the inevitable changes. The article also looks at planning and projects across California, including San Francisco, Ventura and part of Highway 1 near Piedras Blancas.

A new report from Moody's Analytics, summarized by the Washington Post, concludes that climate change will inflict severe economic costs in the future if not controlled. These costs, which will accrue mainly in the second half of this century, will be caused predominantly by impacts to human health, labor productivity, crop yields and tourism. An article in the New Yorker describes the growing movement for governments to declare climate emergencies...

read more

IN BRIEF: PAST
CLIMATE NEWS

MORE MY TAKES