I’m going to do all this reading and research anyway… might as well share what I learn!
NEWS
+
VIEWS
October 31 2019

if everybody planted a tree, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture little help as farmers suffer from climate change, GM investors ask company to join California auto mileage agreement, Walmart and Target try to “out-green” each other, a solar-powered steel mill

An article in Wired presents a back of the envelope computation to answer the question, “if everybody planted a tree would it reduce the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere?” The answer is yes, but tree-planting is not a panacea that will solve the climate problem. An op-ed in The Hill notes the importance of reducing the emissions of other greenhouse pollutants besides carbon dioxide, including methane, refrigerants and soot from fires. These pollutants do not stay in the atmosphere as long as carbon dioxide, but they absorb much more heat while they are there, so eliminating them quickly will immediately reduce the intensity of the greenhouse effect. InsideClimate News reports on nitrous oxide, another greenhouse gas emitted by human activities (predominantly agriculture) that receives less attention than it deserves.

The City of Del Mar near San Diego has developed a coastal adaptation plan that is at odds with the guidance of the California Coastal Commission, according to the Los Angeles Times. The debate revolves around “managed retreat” from the shore as a long-term strategy for dealing with sea level rise. Del Mar has rejected this approach, instead focusing on replenishing sand and reinforcing sea walls, which are unlikely to be sufficient as sea level rise accelerates. This is a conflict that will be more and more common along the coast of California and other states…

read more
October 15 2019

impact of climate change on the oceans, powerful hurricanes spinning, electric vehicles a major California export, reconnecting the Sacramento River to its floodplain, U.S. taxpayers buying risky mortgages

The New York Times reports on a recent U.N. study that documents the extraordinary impacts of climate change on the oceans. Altered chemistry, plummeting fish populations and warmer ocean water exacerbate the stress on marine ecosystems already created by over-fishing, plastic waste and other insults. The report describes how changes to the ocean will have significant implications for human civilization, and includes yet another call for an ambitious transition to an economy free of carbon emissions. The Guardian reports on a study conducted in Australia that documents the importance of mangroves, sea grasses and other coastal wetlands for storing carbon.

With all the news about impeachment, Hurricane Lorenzo did not received much attention, but it should have. While it lost much power before striking Ireland and the U.K., Lorenzo was the most powerful storm ever in a part of the Atlantic Ocean that does not normally see such meteorological events, creating dangerous waves at sea and along the coast. The Washington Post reports that this fits the climate change projections for stronger hurricanes, driven by the warming waters of the Atlantic. The New York Times reports on Typhoon Hagibis, the strongest storm to hit Japan in decades, which generated record rainfall and flooding and caused 3.9 million people to evacuate their homes…

read more

IN BRIEF: PAST
CLIMATE NEWS

MORE MY TAKES
 

NEWS
+
VIEWS
I’m going to do all this reading and research anyway… might as well share what I learn!
October 31 2019

if everybody planted a tree, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture little help as farmers suffer from climate change, GM investors ask company to join California auto mileage agreement, Walmart and Target try to “out-green” each other, a solar-powered steel mill

An article in Wired presents a back of the envelope computation to answer the question, “if everybody planted a tree would it reduce the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere?” The answer is yes, but tree-planting is not a panacea that will solve the climate problem. An op-ed in The Hill notes the importance of reducing the emissions of other greenhouse pollutants besides carbon dioxide, including methane, refrigerants and soot from fires. These pollutants do not stay in the atmosphere as long as carbon dioxide, but they absorb much more heat while they are there, so eliminating them quickly will immediately reduce the intensity of the greenhouse effect. InsideClimate News reports on nitrous oxide, another greenhouse gas emitted by human activities (predominantly agriculture) that receives less attention than it deserves.

The City of Del Mar near San Diego has developed a coastal adaptation plan that is at odds with the guidance of the California Coastal Commission, according to the Los Angeles Times. The debate revolves around “managed retreat” from the shore as a long-term strategy for dealing with sea level rise. Del Mar has rejected this approach, instead focusing on replenishing sand and reinforcing sea walls, which are unlikely to be sufficient as sea level rise accelerates. This is a conflict that will be more and more common along the coast of California and other states…

read more
October 15 2019

impact of climate change on the oceans, powerful hurricanes spinning, electric vehicles a major California export, reconnecting the Sacramento River to its floodplain, U.S. taxpayers buying risky mortgages

The New York Times reports on a recent U.N. study that documents the extraordinary impacts of climate change on the oceans. Altered chemistry, plummeting fish populations and warmer ocean water exacerbate the stress on marine ecosystems already created by over-fishing, plastic waste and other insults. The report describes how changes to the ocean will have significant implications for human civilization, and includes yet another call for an ambitious transition to an economy free of carbon emissions. The Guardian reports on a study conducted in Australia that documents the importance of mangroves, sea grasses and other coastal wetlands for storing carbon.

With all the news about impeachment, Hurricane Lorenzo did not received much attention, but it should have. While it lost much power before striking Ireland and the U.K., Lorenzo was the most powerful storm ever in a part of the Atlantic Ocean that does not normally see such meteorological events, creating dangerous waves at sea and along the coast. The Washington Post reports that this fits the climate change projections for stronger hurricanes, driven by the warming waters of the Atlantic. The New York Times reports on Typhoon Hagibis, the strongest storm to hit Japan in decades, which generated record rainfall and flooding and caused 3.9 million people to evacuate their homes…

read more

IN BRIEF: PAST
CLIMATE NEWS

MORE MY TAKES