I’m going to do all this reading and research anyway… might as well share what I learn!
NEWS
+
VIEWS
April 15 2019

climate action and individual freedom, floods on the Missouri River, the fading coal industry, science group disbanded by Trump reconvenes, a picture book on climate change for adults

The Los Angeles Times reports that the concentration of methane in the atmosphere has been recently rising, which is a troubling sign for controlling global warming. Although methane does not last as long in the atmosphere as carbon dioxide, it is much better at trapping heat, so over the course of 100 years it is about a 30% stronger greenhouse gas. The chemical composition of the methane suggests it is coming from natural sources in the tropics, including wetlands or agriculture (yes, including cow burps), but the actual reason for the rise is not yet understood.

An op-ed in the Sun-Sentinel makes the argument that if you want to maintain individual freedom, it is essential to control greenhouse gases and avoid the worst impacts of climate change. An op-ed in the Guardian compares President Trump’s support for climate denialism to Joseph Stalin’s support for the pseudo-scientific theories of Russian geneticist Trofim Lysenko, who claimed humans could pass on acquired traits to their offspring…

read more
March 31 2019

extreme flooding, TV meteorologists bring climate science to conservative viewers, future carbon emissions from existing infrastructure, Trump a loser in court (where facts matter), Green New Deal changes Congressional conversation

Some of our most devastating floods, like the 1997 San Joaquin flood or the 2017 flood on the Feather River that damaged Oroville Dam and caused the evacuation of 180,000 Californians, are caused in part by rain falling on a large snowpack. A warm rainstorm can melt snow very quickly, overwhelming flood control infrastructure. InsideClimate New reports on recent conclusions that, if greenhouse gas emissions are allowed to continue at their current pace, the odds of severe rain-on-snow floods could triple in 10 Western river systems. In the spring of 2019, given our large snowpack, a warm “pineapple express” or “atmospheric river” storm could greatly enhance flood danger in the Sierras and the Central Valley.

Rain-on-snow is one of the physical phenomena driving the current flooding in the Midwest, and Wired reports on the recent announcement by NOAA that this year’s flooding is by no means over. NOAA’s spring flood outlook indicates that two-thirds of the country is at risk of “major to moderate flooding, from Fargo, North Dakota, on the Red River of the North down to Nashville, Tennessee, on the Cumberland River.” The floods from the past two weeks have compromised 200 miles of levees in Nebraska, Iowa, Missouri and Kansas, according to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, and Reuters examines the role of climate change in this flooding event. An article in the New York Times provides a great (and painful) illustration of the challenge we face as the hydrologic cycle changes in our new climate, in this case the inability of our existing infrastructure to manage the amount of water in the Missouri River basin…

read more

IN BRIEF: PAST
CLIMATE NEWS

MORE MY TAKES
 

NEWS
+
VIEWS
I’m going to do all this reading and research anyway… might as well share what I learn!
April 15 2019

climate action and individual freedom, floods on the Missouri River, the fading coal industry, science group disbanded by Trump reconvenes, a picture book on climate change for adults

The Los Angeles Times reports that the concentration of methane in the atmosphere has been recently rising, which is a troubling sign for controlling global warming. Although methane does not last as long in the atmosphere as carbon dioxide, it is much better at trapping heat, so over the course of 100 years it is about a 30% stronger greenhouse gas. The chemical composition of the methane suggests it is coming from natural sources in the tropics, including wetlands or agriculture (yes, including cow burps), but the actual reason for the rise is not yet understood.

An op-ed in the Sun-Sentinel makes the argument that if you want to maintain individual freedom, it is essential to control greenhouse gases and avoid the worst impacts of climate change. An op-ed in the Guardian compares President Trump’s support for climate denialism to Joseph Stalin’s support for the pseudo-scientific theories of Russian geneticist Trofim Lysenko, who claimed humans could pass on acquired traits to their offspring…

read more
March 31 2019

extreme flooding, TV meteorologists bring climate science to conservative viewers, future carbon emissions from existing infrastructure, Trump a loser in court (where facts matter), Green New Deal changes Congressional conversation

Some of our most devastating floods, like the 1997 San Joaquin flood or the 2017 flood on the Feather River that damaged Oroville Dam and caused the evacuation of 180,000 Californians, are caused in part by rain falling on a large snowpack. A warm rainstorm can melt snow very quickly, overwhelming flood control infrastructure. InsideClimate New reports on recent conclusions that, if greenhouse gas emissions are allowed to continue at their current pace, the odds of severe rain-on-snow floods could triple in 10 Western river systems. In the spring of 2019, given our large snowpack, a warm “pineapple express” or “atmospheric river” storm could greatly enhance flood danger in the Sierras and the Central Valley.

Rain-on-snow is one of the physical phenomena driving the current flooding in the Midwest, and Wired reports on the recent announcement by NOAA that this year’s flooding is by no means over. NOAA’s spring flood outlook indicates that two-thirds of the country is at risk of “major to moderate flooding, from Fargo, North Dakota, on the Red River of the North down to Nashville, Tennessee, on the Cumberland River.” The floods from the past two weeks have compromised 200 miles of levees in Nebraska, Iowa, Missouri and Kansas, according to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, and Reuters examines the role of climate change in this flooding event. An article in the New York Times provides a great (and painful) illustration of the challenge we face as the hydrologic cycle changes in our new climate, in this case the inability of our existing infrastructure to manage the amount of water in the Missouri River basin…

read more

IN BRIEF: PAST
CLIMATE NEWS

MORE MY TAKES