I’m going to do all this reading and research anyway… might as well share what I learn!
NEWS
+
VIEWS
December 15 2018

National Climate Assessment, climate migration in America, emissions climb in 2018, the future of coral reefs

The second volume of the fourth National Climate Assessment, a legally-mandated report authored by 13 federal agencies, has been released. The first volume (released last year) focused on the science of climate change, while this volume focuses on the impacts and adaptation (a summary of findings and a FAQ are also available). ClimateNexus summarized the report with the headline “Trump Administration Climate Report: It’s Real, It’s Here, It’s Because of Fossil Fuels. And the Sooner We Fix It, the Better.”

The New York Times summarizes the report (Washington Post coverage here), noting that estimated impacts by the end of the century include $141 billion from heat-related deaths, $118 billion from sea level rise and $32 billion from infrastructure damage. By 2050, the report forecasts changes in rainfall and hotter temperatures that will reduce agricultural productivity in the Midwest to levels last seen in the 1980s and make wildfires more frequent, including in the southeastern U.S. (the Guardian has a great piece on climate change and the American south). The report notes that the actual impacts we experience will depend upon how much we reduce emissions and prepare for the changes ahead. It recommends establishing a price on carbon, limiting greenhouse gas emissions through regulation and expanding government investment in clean energy. Slate has a nice synopsis of the report and its implications in a readable narrative, and a blog post at the Union of Concerned Scientists examines agricultural impacts…

read more
November 30 2018

global warming and extreme weather, using the farm bill to combat climate change, growing air conditioning demand in Asia, shrimp fishery closed in the warming Gulf of Maine

A new study summarized by InsideClimate News provides more evidence that global warming, and particularly the warming of the arctic, is changing the jet stream and leading to more extreme weather events. Because the arctic is warming more quickly than the rest of the earth, the difference in temperature between the tropics and the arctic is declining. This reduced temperature gradient contributes to the jet stream taking on a more “wavy” shape that is more stable, leading to stationary highs and lows in atmospheric pressure that drive some extreme weather events (especially droughts, floods and wildfires).

In the New Yorker Bill McKibben’s article How Extreme Weather is Shrinking Planetsynthesizes our recent experiences with extreme weather. He notes that “until now, human beings have been spreading, from our beginnings in Africa, out across the globe—slowly at first, and then much faster. But a period of contraction is setting in as we lose parts of the habitable earth.”

An article in The Daily Climate describes how the farm bill could be used to help build soil carbon and a more climate-resilient agricultural sector. InsideClimate News reports on a new study that concludes a set of 21 “natural climate solutions,” deployed across agricultural lands, forests, grasslands and wetlands, could mitigate over 20 percent of the country’s net annual greenhouse gas emissions.

In the Guardian David Sirota notes the oil industry spent heavily to defeat state and local propositions that would limit fossil fuel use, while publicly endorsing a “carbon tax,” demonstrating their willingness to accelerate the climate crisis if it will be profitable for them. An op-ed in the New York Times by a former EPA official describes the impact on public health as the Trump administration eliminates independent science from the EPA’s decision-making…

read more

IN BRIEF: PAST
CLIMATE NEWS

MORE MY TAKES
 

NEWS
+
VIEWS
I’m going to do all this reading and research anyway… might as well share what I learn!
December 15 2018

National Climate Assessment, climate migration in America, emissions climb in 2018, the future of coral reefs

The second volume of the fourth National Climate Assessment, a legally-mandated report authored by 13 federal agencies, has been released. The first volume (released last year) focused on the science of climate change, while this volume focuses on the impacts and adaptation (a summary of findings and a FAQ are also available). ClimateNexus summarized the report with the headline “Trump Administration Climate Report: It’s Real, It’s Here, It’s Because of Fossil Fuels. And the Sooner We Fix It, the Better.”

The New York Times summarizes the report (Washington Post coverage here), noting that estimated impacts by the end of the century include $141 billion from heat-related deaths, $118 billion from sea level rise and $32 billion from infrastructure damage. By 2050, the report forecasts changes in rainfall and hotter temperatures that will reduce agricultural productivity in the Midwest to levels last seen in the 1980s and make wildfires more frequent, including in the southeastern U.S. (the Guardian has a great piece on climate change and the American south). The report notes that the actual impacts we experience will depend upon how much we reduce emissions and prepare for the changes ahead. It recommends establishing a price on carbon, limiting greenhouse gas emissions through regulation and expanding government investment in clean energy. Slate has a nice synopsis of the report and its implications in a readable narrative, and a blog post at the Union of Concerned Scientists examines agricultural impacts…

read more
November 30 2018

global warming and extreme weather, using the farm bill to combat climate change, growing air conditioning demand in Asia, shrimp fishery closed in the warming Gulf of Maine

A new study summarized by InsideClimate News provides more evidence that global warming, and particularly the warming of the arctic, is changing the jet stream and leading to more extreme weather events. Because the arctic is warming more quickly than the rest of the earth, the difference in temperature between the tropics and the arctic is declining. This reduced temperature gradient contributes to the jet stream taking on a more “wavy” shape that is more stable, leading to stationary highs and lows in atmospheric pressure that drive some extreme weather events (especially droughts, floods and wildfires).

In the New Yorker Bill McKibben’s article How Extreme Weather is Shrinking Planetsynthesizes our recent experiences with extreme weather. He notes that “until now, human beings have been spreading, from our beginnings in Africa, out across the globe—slowly at first, and then much faster. But a period of contraction is setting in as we lose parts of the habitable earth.”

An article in The Daily Climate describes how the farm bill could be used to help build soil carbon and a more climate-resilient agricultural sector. InsideClimate News reports on a new study that concludes a set of 21 “natural climate solutions,” deployed across agricultural lands, forests, grasslands and wetlands, could mitigate over 20 percent of the country’s net annual greenhouse gas emissions.

In the Guardian David Sirota notes the oil industry spent heavily to defeat state and local propositions that would limit fossil fuel use, while publicly endorsing a “carbon tax,” demonstrating their willingness to accelerate the climate crisis if it will be profitable for them. An op-ed in the New York Times by a former EPA official describes the impact on public health as the Trump administration eliminates independent science from the EPA’s decision-making…

read more

IN BRIEF: PAST
CLIMATE NEWS

MORE MY TAKES