I’m going to do all this reading and research anyway… might as well share what I learn!

NEWS
+
VIEWS

May 15 2018

mosquito-borne diseases, offshore wind, an Antarctic expedition, the “hockey stick graph” turns 20

The New York Times reports that according to the Centers for Disease Control the number of people getting diseases transmitted by mosquito, tick and flea bites has more than tripled in the United States in recent years. New tick-borne diseases like Heartland virus are showing up in the continental United States, while cases of Lyme disease and other established infections are becoming more frequent. Warmer weather is an important cause of the surge, although there are many other factors at play including more frequent jet travel, lack of vaccines and poor support for local health agencies. The CDC study conspicuously avoids mentioning climate change, despite health experts calling climate change a “threat multiplier” for public health.

Reuters reports that a recent study concludes yellow fever is on the rise due to climate change, mobility, urbanization and vaccine shortages. The study notes that Miami is at risk for an outbreak…

read more
April 30 2018

ocean circulation, future rainfall, Pruitt’s actual success, moving carbon from air to soil

The Washington Post reports on research demonstrating that the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC), the current that carries warmth into the Northern Hemisphere’s high latitudes (the “Gulf Stream”), is slowing down because of climate change. The AMOC has declined in strength by 15 percent since the mid-20th century to a “new record low” according to a recent study published in Nature (RealClimate has an informative blog post by one of the paper’s authors about their findings and related recent research, and Nature has also published a less technical summary).

As some recall, a sharp decline in the AMOC was the “scientific” component of the plot of the movie The Day After Tomorrow (2004). While such wild and immediate impacts are not considered plausible there is no doubt that a weakening AMOC can produce major impacts to our climate, including scenarios for abrupt climate change. While some scientists debate the significance of the findings in terms of the timing of impacts, others are quite concerned that this measured slowing…

read more

IN BRIEF:
CLIMATE NEWS

 

 
MY TAKE
 

NEWS
+
VIEWS

I’m going to do all this reading and research anyway… might as well share what I learn!

May 15 2018

mosquito-borne diseases, offshore wind, an Antarctic expedition, the “hockey stick graph” turns 20

The New York Times reports that according to the Centers for Disease Control the number of people getting diseases transmitted by mosquito, tick and flea bites has more than tripled in the United States in recent years. New tick-borne diseases like Heartland virus are showing up in the continental United States, while cases of Lyme disease and other established infections are becoming more frequent. Warmer weather is an important cause of the surge, although there are many other factors at play including more frequent jet travel, lack of vaccines and poor support for local health agencies. The CDC study conspicuously avoids mentioning climate change, despite health experts calling climate change a “threat multiplier” for public health.

Reuters reports that a recent study concludes yellow fever is on the rise due to climate change, mobility, urbanization and vaccine shortages. The study notes that Miami is at risk for an outbreak…

read more
April 30 2018

ocean circulation, future rainfall, Pruitt’s actual success, moving carbon from air to soil

The Washington Post reports on research demonstrating that the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC), the current that carries warmth into the Northern Hemisphere’s high latitudes (the “Gulf Stream”), is slowing down because of climate change. The AMOC has declined in strength by 15 percent since the mid-20th century to a “new record low” according to a recent study published in Nature (RealClimate has an informative blog post by one of the paper’s authors about their findings and related recent research, and Nature has also published a less technical summary).

As some recall, a sharp decline in the AMOC was the “scientific” component of the plot of the movie The Day After Tomorrow (2004). While such wild and immediate impacts are not considered plausible there is no doubt that a weakening AMOC can produce major impacts to our climate, including scenarios for abrupt climate change. While some scientists debate the significance of the findings in terms of the timing of impacts, others are quite concerned that this measured slowing…

read more

IN BRIEF:
CLIMATE NEWS

 

 
MY TAKE