I’m going to do all this reading and research anyway… might as well share what I learn!
NEWS
+
VIEWS
October 15 2020

we can’t afford to not have a Green New Deal, “green” hydrogen, the importance of natural forest restoration, a “gigafire” arrives 30 years early

Critics of the Green New Deal suggest we can’t afford such an investment. The reality is that we can’t afford not to do it. An article in New York Magazine examines the public investment made by the U.S. government to fight World War II as an analogy. “Between 1940 and 1945, the U.S. government managed to increase military spending by an amount equal to 70 percent of 1940 GDP — while increasing productivity and technological innovation, raising civilian living standards, laying the groundwork for a decades-long postwar boom, and avoiding runaway inflation… If we could figure out how to execute public spending and planning on that scale 80 years ago, we can presumably execute it at a fraction of that scale (say, $5 trillion over five years?) today.” The article notes that the WWII mobilization resulted in the income of the top one percent of earners declining by a third. Are the richest Americans willing to make the same investment today?

An article in the New York Times addresses an important scientific truth about climate change through interviews with experts studying the issue. The truth is that the future is going to get worse than the present, even with aggressive reductions in greenhouse gases, because carbon dioxide stays in the atmosphere for a long time. But through our actions we can control how bad things get. As I wrote last year, “the world we get will be the world we choose. We just can’t choose the world we had.” Or, as Texas A&M climate scientist Andrew Dessler says, “If you don’t like all of the climate disasters happening in 2020, I have some bad news for you about the rest of your life.”

The Washington Post reports on recent evidence indicating that the physical restraint on the movement of the Thwaites and Pine Island glaciers in Antarctica is diminishing as their ice shelves break apart. The glaciers already contribute around five percent of global sea level rise. The survival of the Thwaites glacier is seen as critical to slowing the collapse of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet. From the other end of the planet, the New York Times describes the new climate of the Arctic – one that is characterized by warmer temperatures, open water and rain…

read more
September 30 2020

more evidence of a Gulf Stream slowdown, not just California is on fire, climate migration in the U.S., climate change is finally an election issue, age of electric cars is dawning

Two new studies support the growing body of evidence that the Gulf Stream (part of what is formally known as the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation or AMOC) is slowing down in response to global warming. This has long been projected as possible, although the large natural variability means that it is still difficult to measure evidence for this change directly. Unfortunately, indirect evidence is leading more scientists to conclude this might be occurring, as summarized on RealClimate. The potential of the slowing of the AMOC to cause major changes in the Earth’s climate, including pushing the climate past potential “tipping points,” is described in an article in the Guardian. The New York Times discusses the results of a new study concluding that global warming is making marine heatwaves 20 times more likely than in the past.

MIT Technology Review describes the importance of controlled burns and forest thinning in managing the impact of forest fires in California. Almost a century of suppressing fires, which are an integral part of the ecosystem, has resulted in the massive accumulation of fuel that is becoming ever-more combustible as climate change enhances the aridity of the landscape. While we must transition away from fossil fuels to stabilize our climate, the Guardian notes that the massive fires we are seeing will be an inevitable part of our lives for many years to come (Max Moritz of UCSB says, “We are going to have to coexist with wildfire and change the way we build and live”)…

read more

IN BRIEF: PAST
CLIMATE NEWS

MORE MY TAKES
 

NEWS
+
VIEWS
I’m going to do all this reading and research anyway… might as well share what I learn!
October 15 2020

we can’t afford to not have a Green New Deal, “green” hydrogen, the importance of natural forest restoration, a “gigafire” arrives 30 years early

Critics of the Green New Deal suggest we can’t afford such an investment. The reality is that we can’t afford not to do it. An article in New York Magazine examines the public investment made by the U.S. government to fight World War II as an analogy. “Between 1940 and 1945, the U.S. government managed to increase military spending by an amount equal to 70 percent of 1940 GDP — while increasing productivity and technological innovation, raising civilian living standards, laying the groundwork for a decades-long postwar boom, and avoiding runaway inflation… If we could figure out how to execute public spending and planning on that scale 80 years ago, we can presumably execute it at a fraction of that scale (say, $5 trillion over five years?) today.” The article notes that the WWII mobilization resulted in the income of the top one percent of earners declining by a third. Are the richest Americans willing to make the same investment today?

An article in the New York Times addresses an important scientific truth about climate change through interviews with experts studying the issue. The truth is that the future is going to get worse than the present, even with aggressive reductions in greenhouse gases, because carbon dioxide stays in the atmosphere for a long time. But through our actions we can control how bad things get. As I wrote last year, “the world we get will be the world we choose. We just can’t choose the world we had.” Or, as Texas A&M climate scientist Andrew Dessler says, “If you don’t like all of the climate disasters happening in 2020, I have some bad news for you about the rest of your life.”

The Washington Post reports on recent evidence indicating that the physical restraint on the movement of the Thwaites and Pine Island glaciers in Antarctica is diminishing as their ice shelves break apart. The glaciers already contribute around five percent of global sea level rise. The survival of the Thwaites glacier is seen as critical to slowing the collapse of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet. From the other end of the planet, the New York Times describes the new climate of the Arctic – one that is characterized by warmer temperatures, open water and rain…

read more
September 30 2020

more evidence of a Gulf Stream slowdown, not just California is on fire, climate migration in the U.S., climate change is finally an election issue, age of electric cars is dawning

Two new studies support the growing body of evidence that the Gulf Stream (part of what is formally known as the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation or AMOC) is slowing down in response to global warming. This has long been projected as possible, although the large natural variability means that it is still difficult to measure evidence for this change directly. Unfortunately, indirect evidence is leading more scientists to conclude this might be occurring, as summarized on RealClimate. The potential of the slowing of the AMOC to cause major changes in the Earth’s climate, including pushing the climate past potential “tipping points,” is described in an article in the Guardian. The New York Times discusses the results of a new study concluding that global warming is making marine heatwaves 20 times more likely than in the past.

MIT Technology Review describes the importance of controlled burns and forest thinning in managing the impact of forest fires in California. Almost a century of suppressing fires, which are an integral part of the ecosystem, has resulted in the massive accumulation of fuel that is becoming ever-more combustible as climate change enhances the aridity of the landscape. While we must transition away from fossil fuels to stabilize our climate, the Guardian notes that the massive fires we are seeing will be an inevitable part of our lives for many years to come (Max Moritz of UCSB says, “We are going to have to coexist with wildfire and change the way we build and live”)…

read more

IN BRIEF: PAST
CLIMATE NEWS

MORE MY TAKES